Colorado OUT-OF-SCHOOL TIME NETWORK

Reports

Parent and Community Engagement reports.

Youth Sexual Health in Colorado: A Call to Action (10-12)

Colorado youth, like youth across the country, face daily decisions about their bodies, minds, and overall health. The decisions youth make today set the stage for their health and success as adults. How they deal with challenges, how they achieve success, and how they talk with their families about their decisions are among the complex set of questions that young people ask and answer each day. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has identified unintended pregnancy and the prevention of infectious diseases as two of Colorado’s ten Winnable Battles. This Call to Action offers health, educational, and economic strategies that will help improve the well-being of all Colorado youth. Authors/Publisher: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. (2012). Youth Sexual Health in Colorado: A Call to Action. Denver, CO.

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Families and ELO: Working Together to Support Children’s Learning – HFRP/NCSL Brief 2 (04-12)

As the primary bridge between multiple learning settings, parents play an important role in helping to broker and foster their children’s learning experiences. For this reason, there is an increasing need for ELOs to engage families in more pivotal and meaningful ways. ELOs can provide parents with approachable entry points to schools and their child’s education. Authors/Publisher: Erin Harris (HFRP), Heidi Rosenberg (HFRP) and Ashley Wallace (NCSL). Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) and the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL). http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources

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Teaching Cases on Family Engagement: Early Learning (Ages 0–8) (1/2012)

Teaching cases can be valuable tools in preparing early childhood educators to engage effectively with families. Because the case method presents a story in practice, it offers education students and educators an active learning opportunity. These teaching cases involve real-world situations and consider the perspectives of various stakeholders, including early childhood program and elementary school staff, parents, children, and community members. Authors/Publisher: Harvard Family Research Project. http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources/teaching-cases-on-family-engagement-early-learning-ages-0-8

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Encouraging Positive Parenting in Early Childhood: Lessons From a Community Change Initiative(01/12)

This report examines efforts to improve parenting practices in Trenton, NJ, as part of the larger Children's Futures (CF) initiative. CF was launched in 2002 with the goals of enhancing the health and well-being of children, from birth to three years old, and ensuring their readiness to enter school. Although the initiative proved successful on a number of other fronts, it was not able to produce measurable changes in parenting practices citywide. This report suggests potential reasons why, examining CF programming and instructional strategies, participation levels, and psychological factors that have been linked to parenting practices in past research. The report draws on these findings to offer important lessons for those who are funding, implementing or evaluating programs for parents of young children, as well as broader community change initiatives. Authors/Publisher: Karen E. Walker, Amy Arbreton, Sarah K. Pepper and Chelsea Farley. Public/Private Ventures and Child Trends. http://www.ppv.org/ppv/publication.asp?section_id=27&search;_id=&publication_id=336

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The Family Engagement for High School Success Toolkit (11/11)

Research shows that family engagement in education is directly related to a range of benefits for students, including improved school readiness, higher academic achievement, better social skills and behavior, and increased likelihood of high school graduation. As part of the Family Engagement for High School Success initiative (Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP), with funding and support from AT&T, and United Way Worldwide), a toolkit has been developed that is comprised of two parts: Part I focuses on the comprehensive planning that goes into the development of a family engagement initiative, and Part II focuses on the early implementation process. Authors/Publisher: HFRP’s Dr. Heather Weiss, Dr. M. Elena Lopez, Heidi Rosenberg, Evelyn Brosi, and Diana Lee were the primary authors of this toolkit. http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources/

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School Leadership for Authentic Family and Community Partnerships (11/11)

Book. School leaders are increasingly called upon to pursue meaningful partnerships with families and community groups, yet many are unprepared to meet the challenges of partnerships, to cross cultural boundaries, or to be accountable to stakeholders. Too often, schools set the agenda for partnerships and expect deferential support from parents and community leaders. Authentic alliances are needed among educators, families, and communities that value relationship building, dialogue, and power sharing as part of socially just, democratic schools. This collection of original scholarly articles is a unique resource that brings together research perspectives from both the fields of leadership and partnerships to inform and inspire practice. Its 14 chapters address tensions embedded in school-community relations and offer models and strategies that move toward more authentic forms of collaboration. Authors/Publisher: Susan Auerbach, ed.; Routledge. http://www.routledge.com

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Scaling Up School and Community Partnerships: The Community Schools Strategy (11/2011)

Builds on both practice and research to describe the what, why, and how of system-wide expansion of community schools. The guide is written for a wide audience and for communities at different points in planning for, implementing, and sustaining a community schools strategy. Authors/Publisher: Atelia Melaville, Reuben Jacobson,and Martin J. Blank. Coalition for Community Schools, Institute for Educational Leadership. www.communityschools.org

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The Head Start Parent, Family, and Community Engagement Framework (Ages 0-8) (8/ 2011)

Report is about building relationships with families that support family well-being, strong relationships between parents and their children, and ongoing learning and development for both parents and children. It is a research-based approach to program change that shows how an agency can work together as a whole—across systems and service areas— to promote parent and family engagement and children’s learning and development. Authors/Publisher: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start. http://www.hfrp.org/family-involvement/publications-resources/parent-family-and-community-engagement-framework-promoting-family-engagement-and-school-readiness-from-prenatal-to-age-8

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AfterZone: Outcomes for Youth Participating in Providence’s Citywide After-School System (8/2011)

The AfterZone model has four key features. First, it employs a single set of quality standards and offers training and support to its providers. Second, it is structured around a neighborhood “campus” model, where services are offered at multiple sites in a geographically clustered area, known as a “zone.” Each zone includes several programs located in community-based facilities but is anchored by one or two middle schools, where the program day begins and ends for every youth. Third, the AfterZone’s structure and organizational practices are designed to be developmentally appropriate for middle-school-age youth, for instance, by encouraging greater independence and exposing youth to new experiences. Fourth, PASA not only coordinates the key players in the AfterZone system but also leads the check-in and check-out process each day at the zones it leads, provides its own academically oriented enrichment activities through “Club AfterZone” and employs AfterZone staff to supervise and coordinate these activities. Authors/Publisher: Tina J. Kauh. Public/Private Ventures for The Wallace Foundation http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/after-school/evaluations/Pages/AfterZone-Outcomes-for-YouthParticipating-in-Providences-Citywide-After-School-System.aspx

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Aligning Afterschool with the Regular School Day: The Perfect Complement (07/2011)

Issue Brief 50. Afterschool programs that are aligned with the school day curriculum can support student learning and attack the achievement gap by offering additional supports to struggling students that complement and reinforce learning that takes place in the classroom in new and exciting ways. Collaboration and alignment among schools, expanded learning programs and the greater community offers students the opportunity to enjoy a complementary learning environment where they can truly thrive. Authors/Publishers: Afterschool Alliance http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/issue_50_schoolDay.cfm

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Parent Involvement & Extended Learning Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Midwest (4/11)

Analysis of school improvement plans in five Midwest Region states reveals that more than 90 percent of plans included at least one “potentially effective” parent involvement activity and 70 percent included at least one extended learning activity (a before-school, afterschool, or summer program). Few extended learning programs were described as providing academic support. Authors/Publisher: Prepared by Julie Reed Kochanek, Yinmei Wan, Sara Wraight, Leslie Nylen, and Sheila Rodriguez. Learning Point Associates, an affiliate of the American Institutes for Research. U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assis-tance, Regional Educational Laboratory Midwest. http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs

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Partnerships for Learning: Promising Practices in Integrating School & OST Program Supports (3/10)

This report aims is to share with OST program leaders, decision-makers, funders, and schools lessons from successful efforts to forge partnerships between schools and OST programs to support children’s learning and development. Primarily offering lessons for OST programs and intermediaries (the majority of informants for this research represented the program perspective), this report also highlights lessons for schools when appropriate. In many cases, the lessons apply to both programs and schools in their partnering efforts. Authors/Publisher: Harvard Family Research Project. http://www.hfrp.org/content/download/3569/101031/file/OST-PartnershipsforLearning_Report.pdf

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Federal Role in Out-of-School Learning: A-S, Summer & Family Involvement as Learning Supports (2/09)

The importance of out-of-school learning opportunities and that “schools cannot do it alone,” many now are asking the primary policy question that this paper will address: What, in conjunction with good schools, is necessary to increase the chances that all children, especially disadvantaged ones, will enter and leave school with the skills they need for 21st century success? Reviewing the existing research on the contributions of out-of-school learning supports to school success and examine the implications of the research for future federal education policy. It is time for the federal government to lead and support a major effort to reframe the definition of learning—what it is, who enables it, and when it takes place—to encompass all of the places where children and youth learn. Authors/Publisher: Heather B. Weiss, Priscilla M. D. Little, Suzanne M. Bouffard, Sarah N. Deschenes, Helen Janc Malone. Harvard Family Research Project. www.hfrp.org/content/download/3312/97076/file/CL-FederalRoleInOutOfSchoolLearning.pdf

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Case for School-Based Integration of Services… Students, Families & Comm Engage With Schools (1/09

Summarize what is meant by complementary learning and explain how this theory provides a foundation for integrating school-based services. We then review what is known about the impacts of school-based health services, OST opportunities and family supports, highlighting how each affects learning, school connectedness (i.e., positive feelings about school) and access to needed services. We end with a brief summary of the potential benefits of offering these resources through a highly integrated model. Authors/Publisher: Jean Baldwin Grossman and Zoua M. Vang. Public/Private Ventures. www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/267_publication.pdf

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The Positive Impact of Social and Emotional Learning for K-8 Students (12/2008)

This report summarizes results from three large-scale reviews of research on the impact of social and emotional learning (SEL) programs on elementary and middle-school students — that is, programs that seek to promote various social and emotional skills. Collectively the three reviews included 317 studies and involved 324,303 children. Appendix C: Bibliography of Reviewed After-School Studies. Authors/Publisher: Payton, J., R. Weissberg, J. Durlak, A. Dymnicki, R. Taylor, K. Schellinger, and M. Pachan. Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) commissioned by the Lucile Packard Foundation. http://www.lpfch.org/sel/

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Engage Youth: Colorado’s Guide to Building Effective Youth-Adult Partnerships (9/2008)

This guide is a resource for any organization seeking to develop and maintain a successful youth-adult partnership effort. Youth-adult partnerships are a powerful approach to improving policies, programs and practices related to youth. Partnerships require a shift in how youth think about adults and adults think about youth, and this guide provides insight into how to make that transition successful. Authors/Publisher: Kahn, R., Lynn, J., Braga, A., Hoxworth, T., & Donovan, K. Denver, CO: Colorado Youth Partnership for Health, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. www.healthyyouthcolorado.org

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Building, Engaging, and Supporting Family and Parental Involvement in OST Programs (6/2007)

The authors of this brief reviewed several evaluations of family participation in out-of-school-time programs to identify: how this involvement can help both children and families; challenges programs face in efforts to engage parents; and how programs can encourage and sustain involvement. The brief includes specific examples of how programs can address barriers to participation. It concludes with a summary of how one program, the National Organization of Concerned Black Men, added parent-engagement activities to its programming. Author/Publisher: Horowitz, Allison and Jacinta Bronte-Tinkew. Child Trends. http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2007_06_19_RB_ParentEngage.pdf

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Community-Based Learning: Engaging Students for Success and Citizenship (2006)

Numerous approaches to community-based learning are already in use; this paper highlights six models with a particular emphasis on community problem solving: academically based community service, civic education, environment-based education, place-based learning, service learning, and work-based learning. If all students are to succeed, we must pay much more attention to community-based learning as a strategy for engaging and motivating students and for strengthening the relationship between schools and communities. Authors/Publisher: Atelia Melaville, Amy C. Berg, Martin J. Blank. Coalition for Community Schools. http://www.communityschools.org/assets/1/AssetManager/CBLFinal.pdf

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Focus on Families! How to Build and Support Family-Centered Practices in After School (2006)

This guide has recommendations for programs trying to improve their family engagement practices. It has four sections: 1) research on the benefits and challenges of engaging families in after-school programs; 2) four strategies that after-school programs can use to engage families, drawing from current research and program examples; 3) in-depth profiles of three after-school programs actively working to engage families and 4) evaluation tools for collecting family engagement information that can be used to strengthen a program’s connection with families. Author/Publisher: Harvard Family Research Project and Build the Out-of-School-Time Network (BOSTnet). http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/focus-on-families!-how-to-build-and-support-family-centered-practices-in-after-school

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Family Strengthening in Youth Development (5/2005)

This brief discusses how youth-serving programs can involve parents as decision-makers. It presents strategies for how national organizations and initiatives serving youth have empowered parents as partners in their work. It provides an overview of how six organizations have involved families and then provides recommendations for increasing family involvement for other agencies delivering youth programming. Author/Publisher: Family Strengthening Policy Center. Policy Brief No. 6. An Initiative of the National Human Services Assembly. www.nassembly.org/fspc/documents/PolicyBriefs/Brief6.pdf

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High School Survey of Student Engagement (HSSSE) - 2005 Report

The ultimate goal of HSSSE is to document, describe, and strengthen student engagement in educationally purposeful activities in secondary schools nationally. HSSSE provides information that can be used to generate discussions on teaching and learning and guide student improvement activities. HSSSE is a powerful tool in the assessment arena that can complement performance tests. HSSSE data can identify student engagement and school features that affect outcomes. Our primary activity is to conduct an annual survey to assess the extent to which high school students engage in educational practices associated with high levels of learning and development. This data is especially powerful because it pertains to school features that teachers and administrators can improve upon quickly, and often inexpensively, to facilitate student learning and engagement. Authors/Publisher: Center for Evaluation & Education Policy, Indiana University. http://www.indiana.edu/~ceep/hssse

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After-School Initiative’s Toolkit for Evaluating Positive Youth Development (6/2004)

This toolkit includes evaluation question sets that staff of an after-school program could use to assess youth outcomes. It provides question sets to measure outcomes common to after-school programs promoting youth development. The questions cover 45 youth outcomes in the following eight areas: 1) academic success, 2) arts and recreation, 3) community involvement, 4) cultural competency, 5) life skills, 6) positive life choices, 7) positive core values and 8) sense of self. In addition to questions, the toolkit provides tips on developing and administering surveys. Author/Publisher: Toolkit developed by The Colorado Trust and National Research Center, Inc. Denver, CO: The Colorado Trust. http://www.coloradotrust.org/attachments/0000/2849/ASIToolkitJun04.pdf

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Engaging with Families in Out-of-School-Time Learning (4/2004)

This brief provides an overview of how researchers evaluate family engagement in out-of-school-time programs. It defines three strategies for engaging with families: 1) family support for improving children’s learning, 2) support to families and 3) general parent involvement. It also highlights strategies used to engage families from two evaluations, the Extended-Service Schools Initiative and the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Author/ Publisher: Harris, Erin and Chris Wimer. Harvard Family Research Project, No. 4. http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/browse-our-publications/engaging-with-families-in-out-of-school-time-learning

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School Completion and Student Engagement: Information and Strategies for Parents (2004)

Short Brief: High motivation and engagement in learning have consistently been linked to reduced dropout rates and increased levels of school success. Yet, year after year teachers and parents struggle to keep students engaged in school and motivated to succeed. Numerous studies have revealed that student engagement in school declines significantly for many students as they progress through school. Therefore, it is critical that both parents and educators reach out to children who are disengaged from school and consequently unlikely to succeed. Authors/Publisher: Amanda Blount Morse, Sandra L. Christenson, and Camilla A. Lehr. National Association of School Psychologists. http://www.nasponline.org

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Finding Out What Matters for Youth: Key Links in a Community Action Framework for Youth Dev. (2002)

The Community Action Framework for Youth Development was developed to describe the pathways that lead youth to positive outcomes and highlight what needs the most attention. It looks at whether and how developmental outcomes (learning to be productive, learning to connect, and learning to navigate) affect early adult outcomes (economic self-sufficiency, healthy family and social relationships, and community involvement). Gambone et al found that youth who had at least one highly supportive relationship with an adult did better than youth who had none. Author/Publisher: Gambone, M.A, A.M. Klem and J.P. Connell http://www.ydsi.org/YDSI/pdf/WhatMatters.pdf

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